Cycling the Ax 3 Domaines climb

If you plan to be cycling to the summit of Ax 3 Domaines then be ready for some nasty gradients which seem to go on forever. This is a short but steep climb to ride whilst based in the Ariège region of the Pyrenees. The climb to the top of the ski resort was first used as a summit finish in the Tour de France in 2001 and has been used several times by the race since. Chris Froome took a noteable victory on this climb in the 2013 edition of the race. Reflected in the average gradient of over 8% this relatively short route climb certainly packs a lot of punch. The route mapped out below begins and ends in Ax Les Thermes.

Quick Stats

Distance: 8.5km / 5.3mi

Start elevation: 725m / 2,378ft

Max elevation: 1,380m / 4,528ft

Metres climbed: 681m / 2,234ft

Metres descended: 681m / 2,234ft

Categorised climbs: 1

Ax 3 Domaines

Length: 7.8km / 4.85mi

Average gradient: 8.2%

Start point: Ax les Thermes

Elevation at top: 1,380m / 4,528ft

Food and water

Fuel up at your start point of Ax Les Thermes for this short route.

Discover our comprehensive guide to Cycling in the Pyrenees

The climb of Ax 3 Domaines is just one of many great cycling routes in the Ariège which you can enjoy. This area of the Pyrenees is very popular with cyclists who are keen to ride some of the famous climbs of the Tour de France for themselves.

If you are not familiar with this region then, our comprehensive guide will help you plan everything you need for your cycling holiday. The guide includes information such as:

  • a map of the French Pyrenees with climbs and towns marked
  • where to base yourself whist on your cycling holiday
  • cycling hotels and lodges
  • bike hire outlets
  • getting to and from the Pyrenees
  • non-cycling attractions and activities in the region

Click here to see a list of cycling routes available in the Pyrenees. We have mapped out 38 rides across five regions within the Pyrenees mountain range for you to explore.


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Looking down a layer of cloud in the valley from the summit of Col du Tourmalet

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